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White people get so angry at the phrase, “You cannot be racist towards white people.”

I will never understand why.

Why are you so angry that you are being treated as actual human beings? You are not reduced to caricatures, but portrayed as characters. You are treated fairly, judged not by your skin tone, but by the ways that you carry yourselves, by your actions.

Why do you want to experience racism so badly? It is not fun to be mocked, dehumanized, attacked, killed, incarcerated simply for daring to exist. It is not fun to know nothing of your history or family because it was torn apart, whether through distance or death. It is not fun to hear, at every turn, comments reminding you of your lesser status as humans.

Do you really want to turn on the tv, open a magazine, watch a movie, play a video game, and not see yourself? Or, even better, to only see yourself as a criminal, as a drunk, a mocking stereotype, or as someone to be killed off? Or would you rather see fleshed out, well-written characters with lives and personalities and feelings? I know which I’d rather pick.

If I were a white person, the phrase, “You cannot be racist towards white people,” would be the best thing I could ever hear.

i finally put some thoughts into words // thedeathcats (via taint3ed)

(via melanatedconsciousness)

(via thetpr)

(via thetpr)

thechanelmuse:

NY Father Dies After Being Choked By Police

A Staten Island man died as police tried to take him into custody Thursday afternoon, and the incident was caught on video by a bystander. 43-year-old Eric Garner, known as “Big E” to many in the neighborhood, went into cardiac arrest as police attempted to handcuff him around 4:45 p.m. outside 202 Bay Street in Tompkinsville. The NYPD says they were arresting him for selling untaxed cigarettes, but witnesses say he had just broken up a fight and was wrongly targeted by police.

In the video, which was obtained by the Daily News, Garner is seen telling officers, “I was just minding my own business. Every time you see me you want to mess with me. I’m tired of it. It stops today!” The Staten Island Advance reports that Garner was out on bail with three pending criminal cases against him, all involving charges of possession and sale of untaxed cigarettes.

Another witness tells the Advance that Garner “tried to break up the fight—the two guys fighting, they saw the cops coming and walked away.”

When more officers arrived at the scene and attempted to handcuff Garner, who weighed 350 pounds, he’s seen swatting their hands away and saying, “Don’t touch me, please.” One officer puts him in a chokehold as the others struggle to pull him to the ground and get his arms behind his back. Garner, an asthmatic, can be heard repeatedly saying, “I can’t breathe.”

"They jumped him and they were choking him," says Ramsey Orta, who knew Garner and took the video. "He was foaming at the mouth,” Orta told The News. “And that’s it, he was done. The cops were saying, ‘No, he’s OK, he’s OK.” He wasn’t OK.” Another friend of Garner says, "He’s a very big man, very intimidating, but he’s just a big teddy bear. He’s the nicest guy. I can’t believe what I saw. That’s no way to do an arrest."

One police source tells the Advance, “He absolutely resisted arrest. He took a fighting stance.” The official NYPD statement asserts that Garner was selling untaxed cigarettes. “Upon attempting to arrest the suspect for the violation, the suspect went into cardiac arrest and was transported by EMS to Richmond University Medical Center where he was pronounced DOA. The Medical Examiner will determine the cause of death.”

Garner leaves behind 6 children including a 3-month-old daughter, Legacy Garner, and a wife, Esaw Garner, who tells the News her husband was unable to work because he suffered from chronic asthma, diabetes and sleep apnea. “When I kissed my husband this morning, I never thought it would be for the last time,” Garner says.

The Advance reports that within an hour after Garner’s death, handwritten signs hung near the incident declared, “no justice, no peace” and “Another innocent black man has been killed by police brutality. The NYPD must be stopped!” One police source tells the News, “A guy is dead in our custody. That is always a potential problem.”

Source

(via thetpr)

brntsienna:

 

Cesar Chavez (2014)

(via knowledgeequalsblackpower)

You are personally responsible for becoming more ethical than the society you grew up in.

Eliezer Yudkowsky  (via rampias)

Being a “product of their times” is no excuse. Never let someone off the hook for bigotry. 

(via callingoutbigotry)

(via knowledgeequalsblackpower)

Are we more concerned with the size, power and wealth of our society or with creating a more just society? The failure to pursue justice is not only a moral default. Without it social tensions will grow and the turbulence in the streets will persist despite disapproval or repressive action. Even more, a withered sense of justice in an expanding society leads to corruption of the lives of all Americans. All too many of those who live in affluent America ignore those who exist in poor America; in doing so, the affluent Americans will eventually have to face themselves with the question that Eichmann chose to ignore: How responsible am I for the well-being of my fellows? To ignore evil is to become an accomplice to it.

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Taken from his last book “Where Do We Go from Here: Chaos or Community?” (1967) (pages 85-86)

(via knowledgeequalsblackpower)

languagethatiuse:

A man and innovator of the Blues, Mr. Robert Johnson, in this one of two known photographs to exist of this man who supposedly sold his soul to the devil at the crossroads to play the guitar. 

(via blackourstory)

It is not coincidental that hip hop has made “nigga” the most common noun in popular music but you have almost never heard any certified thug utter the word cracker, ofay, honky, peckerwood, wop, dago, guinea, kike or any other white-oriented epithet. The reason for that is simple: Massa ain’t havin’ it. The word fag, once a commonplace derisive in the music has all but disappeared from hip hop’s vocabulary. (Yes, these thugs fear the backlash from white gays too.) And bitch is still allowed with the common understanding that the term is referring to black women. The point is this: debasement of black communities is entirely acceptable—required even— by hip hop’s predominantly white consumer base.
We Still Wear The Mask— William Jelani Cobb (via deluxvivens)

(via blackourstory)